Carolina Colonoscopy Center specializes in: Preventing Colon Cancer.

Does it matter who does your colonoscopy or where it is done? Yes, it does!

By specializing and participating in numerous research innovations, Carolina Colonoscopy Center has consistently been the thought leader.

Carolina Colonoscopy Center specializes in: Preventing Colon Cancer.

Does it matter who does your colonoscopy or where it is done? Yes, it does!

By specializing and participating in numerous research innovations, Carolina Colonoscopy Center has consistently been the thought leader.

Colonoscopy and Colon
Cancer Prevention

Lloyd

Mission Statement: To eliminate unnecessary suffering and death from colon cancer.

A new patient is diagnosed with colon cancer every three minutes and a death occurs from colon cancer every ten minutes.

Does it matter who does your colonoscopy or where it is done? Amazingly, some doctors deliver ten-times the protection from colon cancer.

Our progressive innovation has produced the best outcomes.

  • We were the first to bring video endoscopy to the Midlands.
  • We introduced routine anesthesia provided by certified anesthetists.
  • We created the Tandem Colonoscopy team approach which permits far more thorough inspection of the colon surfaces, more pre-cancerous polyps are found and destroyed eliminating the risk for cancer.

 

Myths On Colorectal Cancer

Myth 1 - All Colonoscopists are the same, right?

Does it matter which doctor does your colonoscopy? The sad truth is, it matters tremendously. It’s your butt that is on the line. We certainly expect that all physicians performing coloscopies should provide excellent protection. Unfortunately, this is not true.

A group of twelve board-certified, experienced gastroenterologists in a single practice outside Chicago demonstrated a more than ten-fold difference in polyp detection. This means that there is more than a one-thousand percent variation in finding pre-cancerous polyps among the partners. If you were screened by one of the doctors in the group functioning below the established national standard, you received virtually no protection. Your risk of developing colorectal cancer remains the same as if you were never screened.

So what is ADR and why is it important?

The American College of Gastroenterology developed a simple measure of quality. The ADR or adenoma detection rate is simply the proportion of patients presenting for screening that harbor at least one adenoma (a pre-cancerous polyp). The minimum standard set is 25.

Select your colonoscopist carefully. When you schedule your appointment, ask, “What is my Dr.’s ADR?” Be empowered! If the practice cannot tell you the score or the score is below 25, keep searching. Get your screening on time by a high-AD colonoscopist. This alone will reduce your risk of dying of colon cancer by 90%. If all doctors performing colonoscopy maintained the minimum standard of quality, we would save 25,000 lives every year!

Myth 2 - Colonoscopy is Painful.

A lot of people have memories of the flex sig days. Up until 2005 we used Demerol and Versed. Ideally, this should have created amnesia in patients. However, in many cases this did not work. Far too many patients had recollections of a very painful procedure.

Fortunately, Propofol changed that. Propofol is the number 1 induction anesthetic used in hospitals throughout America. Propofol Is is an extremely safe drug when used properly. It is very powerful. You are asleep in 30 seconds and awake and remember everything 10 minutes after the test. You will be fully functioning, and the doctor will be able to discuss the findings of your test before you leave.

Myth 3 - Colonoscopy is a test to see if I have colon cancer.

Many are familiar with mammograms as a common cancer screening test. Colonoscopy is 50 times more likely to save a life because it is not an early detection test, it is a prevention test. Preventing cancer is far more valuable than early detection. Colon cancer does not start out as full-blown cancer like breast cancer it begins with a benign growth called a polyp. From the time a polyp is first visible during colonoscopy until it turns into cancer takes 12 years! Yes, 12 years. A colonoscopy provides the opportunity to not only detect polyps, but to also remove and destroy them.

book-image

Victory

Truth, Failure & Solutions To The War On Cancer
VOl 1

side-img-02

Get a Colonoscopy Columbia SC

Carolina Colonoscopy Center

Our Blog

How to select to whom to refer colonoscopies?

A group? An individual? Does it matter? Image above of colon with tumors present.

Read More

How Do You Screen for Colorectal Cancer?

Colonoscopy, Virtual, Cologuard, FOBT/FIT- look at the GRID. Image above of colon with inflammation.

Read More

Good News

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) has been renamed: It is the preventable cancer. Image above of normal colon.

Read More